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Geometry is used in various aspects of daily life like art, architecture, engineering, robotics, astronomy, sculptures, space, nature, sports, machines, cars, and much more.

Where are the shapes used in real life?

Shapes
Shapes in real life

Windows, doors, bed, chairs, TVs, mats, rugs, cushions, etc. have different shapes. Moreover, bedsheets, quilts, covers, mats, and carpets have different geometric patterns on them. Geometry is also important for cooking.

The word” geometry” is derived from the Greek word “geo” and “metron” which mean earth and measurement, respectively. Translating roughly to “earth’s measurement,” geometry is primarily concerned with the characteristics of figures as well as shapes.

It also helps us decide what materials to use, what designs to make, and also plays a vital role in the construction process itself. Different houses and buildings are built in different geometric shapes to give a new look as well as to provide proper ventilation inside the house.

Practically, geometry plays a great role in determining the areas, volumes, and lengths. Euclid is considered to be the “father of geometry”. Geometry helps students prepare for the real world.

It also helps students understand more complex mathematical concepts. Geometry allows students to have whole-brain thinking.

Shapes in Real Life
Shapes in Real Life

How are shapes important in our daily life?

Learning shapes does not only help children to identify and organize visual information, it helps them learn skills in other curriculum areas including reading, math, and science.

Why is it significant for kids to learn shapes?

From octagonal stops, signs, and rectangular doors to triangular roofs and circular wheel shapes. Shapes are everywhere. Learning shapes not only helps children identify and organize visual information, but it also helps them learn skills in other curriculum areas including reading, math, and science.

For example, an early step in understanding numbers and letters is to recognize their shape. Learning shapes also helps children understand other signs and symbols. A fun way to help your child learn shapes is to make a shape hunt game.

What is a shape in real life?

What are 2D shapes with two dimensions, such as width and height? An example of a 2D shape is a rectangle or a circle. 2D shapes are flat and cannot be physically held because they have no depth, a 2D shape is completely flat.

We are surrounded by shapes in real life. From the droplets of rain to the roundness of oranges, there are all possible types of shapes in nature. There are so many more shapes in real life that we miss out on observing because of the hustle-bustle of our daily lives.

These geometric shapes in real life are so wonderful to see. All shapes, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional, are incredibly important in the context of learning math. The basis of geometry is formed by these shapes.

When children learn with the help of examples, they remember it forever. Let’s take a look at some shapes in real life and what we have observed around us:

Hexagon in real life

Honey Comb Shapes in Real Life
Honey Comb Shapes in Real Life

Hexagons are typically six straight sides of equal length. You may see snowflakes in that pattern.  Ice crystals, the bee house consists of hexagonal cells, all of these and more are common for shapes occurrences of a hexagon in our real life.

Rhombus in real life

The parallelogram whose sides are equal in length is a square or a rhombus. Rhombus can be found in a variety of things around us, such as a kite, windows of a car, a rhombus-shaped earring, the structure of a building, mirrors, and even a section of the baseball field.

It is not a commonly occurring shape in nature; this one is seen in some crystals. But if you observe keenly, you will be able to spot some more!

Square in real life

Four equal straight sides with four right angles form a square. It can be found in the most common shapes, square rubber stamps, and tiles on the floor. Those are all squares that you see around us as examples of squares in real life.

Let us not forget coasters, the chessboard, and the keys to the laptop you are working on! We find the squares in many things around us in real life.

Triangles in real life

In mathematics, a triangle is known as the most important shape. A triangle is a plane figure, and this plane figure consists of three sides and three angles. Based on the sides and angles, there are various types of triangles.

Some essential types of triangles are scalene triangle, isosceles triangle, right-angled triangle, etc. If we want to make our learning effective, we have to give real-life examples. The reason is that we can learn concepts effectively thanks to real-life examples.

These shapes are incredibly common and easy to apply and use in everyday life. Some objects have a triangle shape. Most of the kids start their day by eating sandwiches or a slice of Pizza, road signs, an arrow, and a triangular ruler.

Traffic signs form the most commonly found examples of triangles in our everyday life. When you give these practical examples of the triangular shape, your kids will never forget it. They will remember the concept of the triangular shape.

Learning shapes helps your child learn to differentiate between objects. To memorize how shapes are different from one another, they’ll learn to pay attention to the little details that distinguish shapes.

Children can learn to recognize and name circles, triangles, squares, rectangles, and ovals in preschool. Using materials such as stickers, cubes, books, and toys, teachers expose children to different shapes and help them analyze 2D and 3D shapes of different sizes and orientations.

Geometry is primarily concerned with the properties of shapes and forms

Humans are drawn to diverse shapes, designs, and colors from birth. The aforementioned can be reinforced by the fact that while buying things in the market, humans are drawn to fabrics with cool patterns, books with attractive covers, sunglasses with unique shapes, jewelry with attractive patterns, teacups with beautiful shapes.

Moreover, the geometric shapes of different toys play quite a crucial role in the development of cognitive skills in children during the early stages of their development. The nature surrounding humans constitutes the most significant example of geometry in daily life. 

If one looks closely, one may find various geometric shapes and patterns in leaves, flowers, stems, roots, bark, and the list goes on. The organization of the human digestive system as a tube within a tube also emphasizes the role of geometry.

Leaves on trees vary in shape, size, and symmetries. Different fruits and vegetables have different geometric shapes; take the example of the orange, it is a ball and after peeling it off, one might notice how the individual slices formed the perfect ball.

Looking closely at the honeycomb, one will see hexagonal patterns arranged side by side. Similarly, examining a snowflake under a microscope will enable the examiner to be a guest of beautiful geometric patterns.

The following interesting example of the role of geometry in nature is formed by the pattern known as “six around one”. Floral displays the “six around one” patterns, also called “closest circle fill,” “hexagonal fill,” and “hexagonal tessellated.”

The most common example of engineering in everyday life is technology. Whether it is robotics, computers, or video games. Engineering is applied to almost all basic concepts.

 Computer programmers can work because engineering concepts are always at their disposal. The virtual world of video games is created only because engineering calculations help in designing the complex graphics of video games.

Ray casting, the imaging process, uses a 2D map to simulate the 3D world of video games. Ray casting helps increase processing as the calculations are made for vertical lines on the screen.

Engineering doesn’t even leave a single chance to play an important role in homes, either. Engineering is also the job of cooking. The chef needs to add all the ingredients in exact proportions to make a delicious dish. Also, while organizing a room, every space is used to make the room look more inviting.

 The house is made to look more impressive using vases, paintings, and various decorative pieces, which are in different geometric shapes and have different patterns made on them.

Amazing jewelry with captivating patterns, tea mugs with beautiful forms, and what-not! Geometry can be referred to as being “omnipresent.” The construction of buildings or various monuments has a close relationship with engineering.

Before the architectural forms were created, mathematics and engineering helped in establishing the structural scheme of the building. Theories of proportions and symmetries make up the applications of Geometry in Daily Life.

Moreover, the geometrical shapes of different toys play an utterly crucial role in the development of cognitive skills in children during the early stages of their growth. Let’s discuss a summary of the most important examples of geometry, which play a pivotal role in the daily life of humans.

1. Technology    

The most common example of geometry in everyday life is technology. Be it robotics, computers, or video games. Geometry is applied to almost all the underlying concepts.

Computer programmers can work because the concepts of geometry are always at their disposal. The virtual world of video games is created only because geometric computations help in designing the complex graphics of video games.

Ray casting, the process of shooting, employs a 2-D map for stimulating the 3-D world of video games. Ray casting helps in increasing processing as the calculations are carried out for the vertical lines on the screen.

2.   Nature

Geometric shapes like spheres, circles, and triangles can be found anywhere, even in nature. Learn about different geometric shapes that occur naturally both inside and outside the house, and examine the difference between plane and spatial geometry. 

One of the best examples of geometry in daily life is nature. We can find different geometrical shapes and patterns in leaves, flowers, stems, bark, and so on. A walk in the garden daily will help you discover different 2D and 3D geometrical shapes and symmetries.

The fruits and vegetables consumed by us daily come in different shapes, which act as a great example for children to revise their geometry. One of the finest is seen in a beehive, where bees build their home in the shape of a hexagon.

Which can be seen only through a microscope? Looking closely at a honeycomb, one will see hexagonal patterns arranged randomly. Similarly, examining a snowflake under a microscope will enable the examiner to be the guest of beautiful geometrical patterns.

The next interesting example of the role of geometry in nature is formed by the pattern popularly known as “Six-Around-One.” The flowers exhibit the “six-around-one” patterns, also called “Closest Packing of Circles,” “Hexagonal Packaging,” and “Tessellating Hexagons.” If one looks closely, one might find different geometrical shapes and patterns.

The organization of the human digestive system as a tube within a tube also ascertains the role of geometry. The leaves on the trees are of varying shapes, sizes, and symmetries.

Different fruits and vegetables have different geometrical shapes; take the example of orange, it is a sphere and after peeling it, one might notice how individual slices can form a perfect sphere. The construction of buildings or various monuments has a close relationship with geometry.

3.  Homes

Geometry does not leave even a single chance to play a significant role in homes as well. The windows, doors, bed, chairs, tables, TV, mats, rugs, cushions, etc. have different shapes. Moreover, bedsheets, quilts, covers, mats, and carpets have different geometric patterns on them. Geometry is also significant in cooking.

The chef needs to add all the ingredients in accurate proportions and ratios to put forth a delicious dish. Moreover, while organizing a room, every space is utilized to make the room look more appealing.

A house is made to look more presentable by using vases, paintings, and various decorative pieces, which are of different geometric shapes and have different patterns made on them.

4.  Architecture

The construction of various buildings or monuments has a close relationship with geometry. Before constructing architectural forms, mathematics, and geometry help put forth the structural blueprint of the building.

The theories of proportions and symmetries shape the fixed aspects of all kinds of architectural designs. Pythagoras’ “Principles of Harmony” along with geometry were employed in the architectural designs of the sixth century BC.

Not only were the basics of mathematics coupled with geometrical help in increasing the aesthetics, harmony, and religious value of large structures, but also it was aided in mitigating various hazards resulting from high-speed winds. Moreover, the staircase in all the buildings takes into consideration the angles of geometry.

5.  Arts

 What does art include? Art encompasses the formation of figures & shapes, a basic understanding of 2-D & 3-D, knowledge about spatial concepts, and contribution of estimation, patterns & measurement.

From the aforesaid, it is evident that there is a close relationship between art and geometry. The formation of shapes is a result of the use of geometrical forms like circles, triangles, squares, Mandela, or octagons.

Moreover, the contents of paintings or sculptures are largely affected by the choice and shape of frames. Not forgetting that the principles of projective geometry form the basis of perspective, which is used in most of the paintings.

6.  Sports

Geometrical Shapes in real life

Sports often do not fail a sole chance to use geometrical concepts. The buildings of the sports stadiums and athletic fields take into consideration geometric shapes.

 The athletic fields also employ geometry; hockey, soccer, basketball, and football fields are rectangular. The corner kick spots, goal posts, arcs, D-section, and center circle are marked on the field.

Similarly, the pitches of various other sports like volleyball and basketball take into consideration the geometrical aspects because these pitches have oval as well as circular arcs marked clearly. Talking of track field, semicircular shapes are typically noticeable.

 Angles also play a critical role in predicting the movement of the players, enhancing their performance, and scoring a point.

7.  Designing

Geometry is widely applied in the field of design; the creation of animated figures in video games requires geometry. About art, almost every element of design is entwined with geometric proportions, which are used to depict a story.

Taking the examples of miniature paintings and manuscript illumination, geometric principles are employed to compose the layout. Strict geometric proportions are paid attention to while forming individual letters in calligraphy.

In designing, geometry has a symbolic role to play; as evident from the carvings on the walls, roofs, and doors of various architectural marvels.

8.  Computer-aided design-CAD

Geometry, one of the principal concepts of mathematics, entails lines, curves, shapes, and angles. Before any architectural design is made, computer software helps in rendering visual images on the screen. CAD, software, puts forth the blueprint of the design.

Moreover, it also aids in the simulation of the architectural forms, which allows for a better understanding of the finished product. The principles of geometry are being used extensively in various industrial processes, which allow the designing of graphics.

9.  Mapping

Geometry helps in the accurate calculation of physical distances. It is employed in the field of astronomy to map the distances between stars & planets and between different planets. It also aids in the determination of a relationship between the movements of different bodies in the celestial environment.

Apart from mapping celestial bodies, geometry also plays a vital role in surveying and navigation. Concerning surveying, measurement of the area of land is a result of the accurate determination of the shape of the land. Moreover, in navigation, ships, watercraft, and aircraft utilize angles and also depend on other mathematical concepts for carrying out basic operations.

10.  Medicine

Techniques like x-rays, ultrasounds, MRIs, and nuclear imaging require the reconstruction of shapes of organs, and bones. They are based on geometry only. Physiotherapy also employs geometry.

Geometric properties and features help in defining the image in digital grids. The geometrical concepts do not only aid in visualization, manipulation, image segmentation, correction, and object representation, but also play an important role in increasing stability, fidelity, and efficiency. Bisecting angle techniques and parallel techniques are crucial in radiology.

11.  Geographic information systems

The GPS of the satellites uses geometrical principles to calculate the position of the satellites. The use of coordinate geometry in the Global Positioning System (GPS) provides precise information about the location and time.

GPS employers coordinate to calculate the distance between any two places. The coordinate geometry helps GPS to track transportation accidents and carry out rescue operations. Coordinating geometry also aids in enhancing flight security weather forecasting, earthquake monitoring, and environmental protection. Moreover, various facets of military operations are equipped with GPS.

Explore the previous examples and facts, and you will find yourself getting the necessary knowledge and information to fully grasp the concept of Geometrical Shapes in daily life. So, keep on visiting our Learning Mole to get more knowledge and information.

What are 2D shapes?

Shapes are shapes with two dimensions “width and height”. 2D shapes are flat and cannot be physically held, because they have no depth.

What is Polygon?

Polygon is 2-dimensional shapes. It is a flat shape with straight sides, and its shape is “closed” (all the lines connect up). A regular shape has all sides the same length and all interior angles the same size. An irregular shape has different length sides and/or interior angles.

Polygons for Kids
Polygons for Kids

Here are some examples of 2D Shapes:

Triangle – Square – Kite – Rectangle – Trapezium – Parallelogram – Pentagon – Hexagon – Octagon – Decagon – Nonagon – Rhombus

Circle, oval, and Ellipse are 2D shapes, but are not polygons because they have curves.

https://youtu.be/MqzSSBu02TQ
https://youtu.be/MqzSSBu02TQ

What are Regular and Irregular 2D Shapes?

A 2D shape can be classified as regular or irregular based on the length and the interior angles:

-A 2D Regular Shapes:

All sides in 2D shapes are equal in length and all its interior angles measure the same.

-A 2D Irregular Shapes:

All sides in 2D shapes are unequal length and all its angles are of unequal measures.

Let’s Learn Shapes and Its Properties:

Shape Properties  Sides
Circle A circle has 1 curved side
A semi-circle has 2 sides; 1 curved side and 1 straight side. The full arc is a 180° angle.
A circle has many parts like the circumference, diameter, and radius.
Almost infinite axes of symmetry going through the center.
Examples of the circle: coins and wheels.

Note:
The circumference: is the distance once around the circle.
The radius: The distance between the center of the circle to its circumference is the radius.
The diameter: is a line segment that goes straight across the circle, through the center. The diameter is always double the radius.
1
Oval An oval has no straight sides and no corners, and has 1 face.
Example of oval: An egg.
Ellipse An ellipse is a circle that has been stretched in one direction, to give it the shape of an oval. But not every oval is an ellipse.
Ellipse has two focal points.
Triangle A triangle is a closed shape with 3 sides, 3 vertices and 3 angles.
It can have up to 2 axes of symmetry.
Example of Triangle: Pyramids and slice of pizza.

Types of Triangle:
An equilateral triangle is a regular triangle and each angle equals 60°.
A right-angled triangle is any triangle with one right angle.
A scalene triangle is an irregular triangle. All sides and angles are different.
An isosceles triangle has two sides and two angles that are the same.
3
Square A square is a regular quadrilateral and each angle equals 90°. “ all each sides are equal “
It has four axes of symmetry.
Examples of Square: tables and toasts.
4
Kite A kite has two pairs of equal-length sides and the diagonals cross at right-angles. 4
Rectangle A rectangle has two pairs of parallel straight lines and each angle equals 90°.
It has two axes of symmetry.
Examples of rectangle: televisions, whiteboard, and doors.
4
Rhombus A rhombus has two pairs of parallel lines, as well as equal sides and opposite equal angles.
It has 2 lines of symmetry.
4
Trapezium A trapezium has one pair of parallel lines, and pairs of equal angles. It can have a line of symmetry. 4
Parallelogram A parallelogram has two pairs of parallel lines and opposite equal angles.
Usually has no axes of symmetry. 
4
Pentagon A pentagon has interior and exterior angles. It can be either regular or irregular. 
It can have up to 5 axes of symmetry. 
Example of pentagon : The Pentagon building in the US.
5
Hexagon A hexagon has six sides, six vertices and six angles.
It can have up to 6 axes of symmetry. Hexagon has interior and exterior angles. 
Example of a hexagon: Honeycomb cells.
6
Heptagon A heptagon has interior and exterior angles.
It can be either regular or irregular.
7
Octagon An octagon has interior and exterior angles.
It can have up to 8 axes of symmetry
Example of octagon: The stop sign board. 
8
Nonagon A nonagon has interior and exterior angles.
It can be either regular or irregular.
9
Decagon A decagon has interior and exterior angles. 10

Let’s Draw the 2D Shapes:

3D Shapes

What are the 3D shapes?

3D shapes are shapes with three dimensions, width, height and depth. 3D shapes can be physically held.

3D Shapes

Properties of 3D Shapes

3D shapes have faces (sides), edges and vertices (corners).

Faces

A face is a flat or curved surface on a 3D shape.

Edges

An edge is where two faces meet. 

Vertices

A vertex is a corner where edges meet. The plural is vertices. 

These are Types of 3D Shapes:

Sphere – Hemisphere – Cone – Tetrahedron or Triangular based pyramid – Cylinder – Triangular prism – Hexagonal prism – Pentagonal prism – Cube – Cuboid.

Shapes  Properties Face  Edges  Vertices 
Sphere A sphere is round in shape. 
It is shaped like a ball and is perfectly symmetrical.
It has a radius, diameter, circumference, volume, and surface area.
Every point on the sphere is at an equal distance from the center.
1 Curved surface
Cone A cone is a 3D shape that has a flat base, and a curved surface. Similar to a cylinder, a cone can also be classified as a right circular cone and an oblique cone.
A cone is also a rotated triangle.
Example: ice cream.
Curved surface and 1 face. 1 1
Cylinder A cylinder has a height and a radius. The height of a cylinder is the perpendicular distance between the top and bottom faces.
The shape stays the same from the base to the top.
A cylinder in which both the circular bases lie on the same line is called a right cylinder. 
A cylinder in which one base is placed away from another is called an oblique cylinder.

 

2 circular faces, one at the top and one at the bottom, and 1 curved surface. 2 0
Hemisphere A hemisphere has a curved surface area.
It is not a polyhedron.
A 3D figure obtained by cutting a sphere in half.
1 Curved surface and 1 face.

1

0

Tetrahedron or Triangular -based pyramid A triangle-based pyramid with equal edges and faces is called a regular tetrahedron.
A triangle-based pyramid with unequal edges and faces is called an irregular tetrahedron.
A triangle-based pyramid folds out to a large triangle made up of 4 smaller triangles.
4 6 4
Triangular prism Its five faces include two triangular bases and three rectangular sides.
It is a polyhedron with congruent and parallel.        
9 6
Hexagonal prism The top and bottom bases are equal to each other in length.
The diagonals cross the center point of a regular hexagonal prism.
In a regular hexagonal prism, all the angles of a hexagon are the same.
In an irregular hexagonal prism, all the angles of a hexagon are different.
8 18 12
Pentagonal prism The base of a pentagonal prism is in the shape of a pentagon.
The sides of a pentagonal prism are shaped like a rectangle.
A pentagonal prism is a type of heptahedron, which is a polyhedron with seven plane faces.
A pentagonal prism can also be called a five-sided polygon prism.
The cross-section of a pentagonal prism is a pentagon.
7   15 10
Cube Its length, width, and height are the same. 6 12 8
Cuboid Its length, height, and width are different. 6 12 8

You can mix between some shapes like:

1- The Cone and The Pyramids:

The difference between them is that the cone has a circular base and can roll on its sides.


2- The Cone and The Cylinder :

You can find the difference between them through their rolling point. The circle rolls in a circle, but the cylinder rolls in a straight line.

Let’s Draw “Cube, Cylinder and Cuboid”:

1- Cube:
2- Cylinder:
3- Cuboid:

Let’s Know the Difference between 2D and 3D Shapes:

2D Shapes:

2D means (Two Dimensional) length and width. 2D figures are plane shapes. They have areas but not volume. Straight lines make up the sides of the 2D shapes. They are drawn using X-axes, and Y-axes. 2D shapes are used to give a simple view of an object. All  edges of 2D shapes are clearly visible. It is easy to draw and explain details in 2D shapes. It is easy to draw 2D Shapes.

For Example: Circle, oval, triangle, etc.

3D Shapes:

3D means (Three Dimensional) length, width, and height or depth. 3D shapes do have areas and volume. 3D shapes are drawn using X-axes, Y-axes, and Z-axes. 3D shapes are used to give an architectural view of an object. In 3D shapes, some of the edges are hidden. In 3D shapes, only outer dimensions can be explained. The details become difficult in 3d shapes. 3D shapes are complex in drawing.

  
For Example: sphere, cube, cuboid, etc.

Let’s do an activity with 2D shapes:

 Let’s do an activity with 3D shapes:

When children are toddlers and preschoolers, learning shapes is some of the first contact they make with mathematical concepts. Shapes feature in everyday objects and life, and understanding them is an important part of education. Introducing shapes during the toddler years helps children recognise sequences and patterns in many subjects other than mathematics. Sequences and patterns appear in daily functions, as do shapes, and learning them at an early age can help children in their future endeavours. Learning shapes is an important part of child development and helping them recognise each one can aid them in organising visual information, as well as understanding signs and symbols. 

Shapes in Real Life
Shapes in Real Life

 

Learning Shapes: 2D and 3D Shapes

Not all shapes were created equal and there are a variety of shapes that come in different dimensions. The most common shapes taught in this regard are two-dimensional shapes (2D) and three-dimensional shapes (3D). Learning shapes and their properties introduce children to a variety of mathematical concepts and operations and aid them with understanding these patterns and sequences in their future learning. Learning the different shapes and their names are integral to understanding some of the simplest mathematical operations. Triangles feature heavily with angles and help with the design of structures and so on. Integrating certain knowledge helps children appreciate this and learning shapes correctly can instil the importance of space and how it is seen in everyday life.

The basic 2D shapes that we first learn are usually things like the rectangle, the square, the circle, and the triangle. There are other more complex shapes called polygons. Learning shapes like these are more exciting as they have more edges and have more interesting shapes. These are shapes like hexagons, pentagons, octagons. There are even shapes known as quadrilaterals that have wonderful names like the rhombus. Other shapes like ovals and trapeziums also feature as 2D shapes. They all have different properties and make learning shapes a dynamic and entertaining experience. 

Learning shapes introduces children to a variety of rules around the properties of these objects. Not every shape has the same amount of sides, some don’t even have corners. For example, circles and ovals only have one side and they have no corners. In comparison, rectangles have four sides and four corners; triangles have three sides and three corners, and so on. Knowing the differences between sides and corners is an important part of knowing the differences in shapes and how they are used. It also helps children learn to count. Learning shapes can help with children’s counting abilities as they count all the sides a shape can have. 

There are a variety of methods to teach children the properties of shapes. Using blocks and physical objects, drawing, these ways are all effective examples of learning shapes. Demonstrating how shapes can be learned via storytelling is another effective way of communicating the properties of shapes. Make a story up about a rectangle with your child can encourage their creative and critical thinking skills whilst teaching them about the shape in question. 

Learning Shapes: 3D Shape Nets for Kids

3D shapes are a great method of helping children understand how 3D shapes are made from 2D ones. A 3D net is a net that has all the flat faces or 2D shapes that make up a 3D figure. Every single shape is different and there are a variety of different visuals for each shape. For example, a cuboid will be physically different from a prism. A cube is made up, for example, of six flat faces, as is a cuboid. A prism is made up of five flare faces and son on. Geometric shapes are an exciting way to teach children shapes as they come to terms with how they can see these physical properties in everyday life. It also helps children visually digest information and see how patterns can be used even in the creation of three-dimensional shapes. 

Allow children to recognise 3D shapes in objects around them. This could be their toys or even objects that you own around your home. Helping them notice these shapes and realise how important they are in the things around them will help give learning shapes a more practical edge as they see them being utilised. Ask your children to recognise the shapes and question them why they think that. This is a great way of assessing how much they have learned about shapes and 3D nets and their properties. Things like traffic cones or books are a great way of getting them to visually recognise these 3D shapes.

Learning Shapes: 3D Shape Properties

3D shapes have a variety of different properties which make them highly fascinating to learn about. Showing children and helping them with their mathematical vocabulary, allows them to be able to explain these properties and makes learning shapes even more fun. Helping them recognise what a flat surface is is the beginning of understanding 3D shapes. The edge of a 3D shape refers to any side of a 3D shape where two faces meet. The last word that is associated with 3D shapes is a vertex. A vertex is used to explain the point where edges of the solid figure meet. Knowing this is a key part to understanding 3D shapes. An example of a 3D shape would be a cube. Cubes have 6 faces, 12 edges, and 8 vertices. Vertices are the plural of a vertex. An example of a cuboid that a child could understand is a dice.

Learning shapes like cylinders, cuboids, and prisms is a great way of encouraging children to engage in their surroundings. If you are on a walk, ask them what they see around them. Encourage them to notice different shapes in objects and ask them how they have come to these conclusions. This is a great way to test how well learning shapes lessons has gone for them as they begin to notice the patterns of shapes in outside objects. Even noticing shapes in nature is important. Using bees as an example, their hives where they make the honey are in perfect hexagons where they can store their honeycomb as well. Learning shapes does not have to be a mundane process and can open up plenty of conversation. 

There is a multitude of shapes that your child will learn over the years. One group of shapes is known as a polygon. Knowing the answer to what’s a polygon is an important introduction to the idea of shapes. A polygon is a flat or two-dimensional shape. Learning shapes is an important factor in maths and allows for children to be able to visually understand their world. Not only that, but shapes like polygons can also be used to demonstrate complex mathematical concepts and operations with older children. With younger children, shapes are a creative way of introducing sequences and learning patterns in maths. Polygons open up a wealth of opportunities to teach children and help them absorb maths in a fun and dynamic way. Answering ‘What’s a polygon?’ has never been easier. 

What’s a Polygon?

Learning the answer to what’s a polygon has never been easier with the incredible content available online. Introducing your child to different shapes is one of the first things they will learn as toddlers, and it also serves as an introduction to more complex mathematical concepts. But what’s a polygon exactly? The definition of a polygon is a flat two-dimensional shape, otherwise known as a 2D shape with straight sides that are fully closed. What makes a polygon unique is that all the sides of a polygon must be joined up and the sides of it must always be straight. Even though they have to be fully joined up, polygons can have any number of sides. There doesn’t have to be a set number or even a set shape. This means there are some fantastic looking polygons available. 

Not only do polygons have this incredible array of properties, but there are also two types of polygons: the regular polygon and the irregular polygon. These have slightly different properties and are fascinating in their own right. The regular polygon is a shape where all of its sides are the same length and also have the same angle. It’s a shape that seems to follow all the rules: everything is the same measurements. Irregular polygons are a little trickier. The irregular polygon is a bit funkier as they have sides that are all different lengths and a variety of different angles. What unites the two is that they are all straight and joined up.

Polygons for Kids
Polygons for Kids

While polygons may sound slightly abstract and not anything we’ve ever heard of before, they’re very common shapes. Typical polygons include things like quadrilaterals with four sides, triangles with three sides, pentagons which have five sides, hexagons which have six sides, heptagons with seven sides, octagons which have eight sides, nonagons with nine sides, and decagons which have a whopping ten sides. These are all shapes that play an active role in objects we have in daily life. Polygons are some of the first shapes toddlers are introduced to through tactile play, learning how to fit shapes into shapes as well. Learning the answer to what’s a polygon allows children to equate these things that they’ve learned in early childhood and apply them to other mathematical concepts and operations as they grow older.

Teaching children the answer to what’s a polygon can be a creative and fun process and there is plenty of content online, be it video or written, to help you convey these processes to your children. There are some facts that make teaching your children these things easier. Things like a regular quadrilateral is actually a fancy name for a square. There are also a variety of triangles to learn from. Things like an equilateral triangle is a traditional or regular triangle that we would be used to seeing. A right-angle triangle or an isosceles triangle is, however, lovely examples of not only irregular triangles but also irregular polygons. Children will never be bored as there is a wide variety of shapes to learn from and to enjoy.

2D Shape Properties: What’s a Polygon?

When talking about regular polygons, one of their major features is that they are all the same length. This also translates into their internal angles. All the internal angles of a regular polygon are equal. The size of each interior angle of a regular polygon can be calculated through an equation that is important to remember: (N-2) x 180 ÷ N. N stands for the number of sides on the shape. A great example you could use to demonstrate this could be: (5-2) x 180 ÷ 5. This will then lead you to multiple 3 by 180 and get 540. To achieve your final answer, divide 540 by 5 and your final answer will work out as 108. Using this equation makes working with polygons even easier to explain to children.

There are also important details surrounding polygons that are vital for children to learn about. Teaching children tasks like what is a perimeter or other three-dimensional shapes and their properties can also help them make sense of geometric shapes as a whole. Using creative content to delicately instruct and inspire your children is a great way of helping them engage with mathematical concepts and operations. There are plenty of fascinating ways to help your children get to grips with shapes that are polygons and engage them in the material. Knowing that polygons are two-dimensional is a starting point for them to engage with. Another suggestion is to gently ease them into polygons by beginning with regular polygons and slowly introducing them to irregular polygons. Mathematics doesn’t have to be boring and showing them the incredible ways that math and the different topics that surround it all interlink is a great way of demonstrating its importance.

What is an Irregular Polygon?
What is an Irregular Polygon?

What’s a polygon can be a complex question but with the variety of materials available for educators, parents, and guardians, helping your children learn about these shapes can be an entertaining experience. Polygons are a useful educational tool as well as they can be used as a math resource for people teaching basic math concepts to complex mathematical formulas. Teaching children to spot patterns and teaching them how to utilise them can allow them to understand future math issues. What’s a polygon is more than just learning about shapes, but learning how to deal with complex math operations.

2d shapes for toddlers, preschool, Foundation stage and KS1.

Shapes for Kids- Learn the shapes for preschoolers

Learn the Shapes for Kids – Shapes in Real Life

Shapes in Real Life
Shapes in Real Life

Shapes and Colours for Kids – Shapes for Toddlers – Learning Shapes for Preschoolers – 2d Shapes

This video covers:
Shapes and colours for kids
Shapes for toddlers
Shapes for preschoolers
Shapes for Kindergarten
Shapes for KS1
Basic Shapes for toddlers
Shape activities for preschoolers
Teaching shapes to kindergarten

A list of 2D shapes and colours, an interactive video to help your child learn shapes and colours.

Learn the shapes for Children – 2d and 3d Shape Properties.

An educational math video that will help your child to learn all the 2d and 3d shapes and their properties. Teach your child the 2d and 3d shape names, learn the mathematical vocabulary and understand the different properties. A great video which will support homeschooling, help with homework and allow your child to understand and explore shapes.

This video is suitable for a range of ages from Preschool, Kindergarten and Foundation Stage to KS1, Junior school and KS2.

Colors and Shapes Game:

Matching Colors and Shapes game for Children – Toddlers and Preschool. A fun animated video that helps children to match different shapes and colors. A fish theme with bright, vibrant colors. An interactive way to teach your child different shapes and colors.

When you look out the window, what do you see? Colors and shapes games, green trees, square windows, a whole world of things to identify! Colors and shapes are a game.

Tangram puzzles for kids help teach the basic concepts of geometric shapes and measurements with fun, interactive challenges that kids enjoy.

Colors and Shapes games focus on basic tracing, matching, and building skills kindergarten kids need to train. It features a number of unique mini-games.

Colors and shapes games are fun and educational games for preschool children that help teach object matching and color recognition skills.

Shapes and Games for Kindergarteners

shapes games

  • Find Shapes games All Around Us. Let’s go to the amusement park today! …
  • Match Triangles and Squares. Time to put the correct shape in the correct trolley for a fun trip to the amusement park!
  • Match Rectangles and Circles. …
  • Match shapes.

How do you make learning colors and Shapes Game fun?

There are so many ways to make learning colors and shapes games fun for kids! Cooking, games, crafts, and art activities can all be used to help kids explore and learn about colors and shapes.

What is the shape and colors game?

 shapes and colors

different shapes and colors

Anthony Browne’s Shape Game is a fun activity that children enjoy, but it can also be a valuable creative tool for the classroom. Imaginative drawing games like this one help children to experiment and play, express their ideas visually and develop creative thinking skills.

Identifying and Describing Shapes and colors game

  1. Play a Shapes Game and colors game where students draw a shape out of a bucket and say its name and its color and whether it has curved or straight lines.
  2. Play “I Spy” where students must find real-world objects that match a specific shape and at the same time specific its color.
  3. Go outside on a nature hunt and see what you can find in each shape and its color.
  4. Play with Shape Puzzles. One of my favorite ways to teach Shapes Game and colors to toddlers is to play with shape puzzles.
  5. Be Repetitive. …
  6. Tracing and Coloring. …
  7. Use Shape Sorters. …
  8. Cut Shapes with Play DOH. …
  9. Find shapes and colors Around You. …
  10. Use Q-Tips to Build Shapes. …
  11. Draw Shapes with different colors and Sidewalk Chalk.

Tips for Learning Colors and Shapes

  1. Use What You Have. You don’t need to invest a lot of time and money into special toys and educational materials.
  2. Build Upon Basic Concepts. Start out with very basic ideas first.
  3. Demonstrate Shapes. Show your child rather than simply telling her.
  4. Play With Shapes and Colors every day.
  •  Focus on one color at a time with different shapes.
  • Sort shapes by different colors.
  • Play with color learning toys.
  • Break out those art supplies for shapes and colors!
  • Point out colors that you see!
  • Read color and shapes learning books.

Shapes and colors are an important part of early childhood education. When your child strives to identify and separate blue blocks from yellow ones, she’s learning more than curves, corners, and colors. She’s making new sense of the world and developing the ability to communicate it to you.

 Stamps with different shapes and colors

Stamps with different shapes and colors

So at what age should your child learn shapes and colors?

Colors
Although, as a parent, you should introduce colors and shapes whenever it comes up naturally all through infancy, the rule of thumb is that 18 months is the acceptable age when children can developmentally grasp the idea of colors. Some may learn earlier, others not until they reach early preschool age, and children with vision impairments (like color blindness) may need extra help. In all cases, the concepts should be reinforced straight through to kindergarten.

Fortunately, the world is full of color, so you don’t need any special materials to reinforce the concept. Just by pointing out red apples, green leaves, blue sky, and yellow flowers, you’re demonstrating the idea of naming and describing objects. Sorting and grouping similarly-colored objects, such as a yellow rubber duck with a banana, or an orange with a carrot, can also help separate the name of the object from the color description in your child’s mind.

Shapes
Naming shapes is a skill that takes a little longer to develop. Most children reach about two years of age before they can grasp the concept. Like all developmental stages, this mark is fluid. Generally, by three years of age, a child should be able to identify some basic shapes.

Start by teaching your child a few common shapes, such as squares, circles, and triangles. A slice of bologna or banana is a circle, a slice of cheese is a square, the television is a rectangle. Once mastered, you can move on to trickier shapes like stars, diamonds, and even octagonal stop signs. Like colors, shapes fill our world, offering up examples to make teaching organic.

Beyond Shapes And Colors
It’s a simple truth that learning shapes and colors is fundamental for more advanced learning. What makes objects the same and different is a basis of logic. Pattern recognition, a strong foundation for mathematical concepts, requires the ability to quickly recognize shapes. Being able to trace or draw shapes is a skill that must be mastered in order to write letters and numbers.

There’s nothing like the sight of a child lighting up as she learns a new concept. Every child is born with the curiosity and skills to master the basics, but you can help them along by providing a rich environment and loving play.

Among the first skills that young children need to master the shapes and colors. In different activities, kids recognize the shapes that are showing the correct color. the more points they will earn. As children have success, more and more colors are presented in different shapes.

Explore the previous examples and facts, and you will find yourself getting the necessary knowledge and information to fully grasp the concept of Shapes and colors. So, keep on visiting our Learning Mole to get more knowledge and information.

This fun animated video shows a range of shapes using items from real life. This video helps children recognize shapes in their environment, and Shapes in Real Life is Suitable for toddlers, preschool, kindergarten, and KS1 children.

Geometry is used in various daily life applications such as art, architecture, engineering, robotics, astronomy, sculptures, space, nature, sports, machines, cars, and much more.

Where are shapes used in real life?

The windows, doors, bed, chairs, TVs, mats, rugs, cushions, etc. all have different shapes. Moreover, beds sheets, quilts, covers, mats, and carpets have different geometric patterns on them.

Geometry is also important for cooking. The word” geometry” is derived from the Greek word “goe” and “metron” which mean earth and measurement respectively. Geometry is primarily concerned with the characteristics of figures as well as Shapes in Real life.

Geometry is used in various daily life applications such as art, architecture, engineering, robotics, astronomy, sculptures, space, nature, sports, machines, cars, and much more.

Shapes in Real Life
Shapes in Real Life

Additionally, it helps us decide what materials to use, what designs to create, and also plays a vital role in construction.
Different houses and buildings are built in different geometric shapes to show a new design as well as to provide proper ventilation inside the house.
Practically, geometry plays a great role in determining areas, volumes, and lengths. Euclid is considered to be the “father of geometry”.
Geometry helps students prepare for the real world. It also helps students understand more complex mathematical concepts. With geometry, it allows students to have whole-brain thinking.

How are shapes important in our daily life?

Learning shapes not only helps children identify and organize visual information, it helps them learn skills in other curriculum areas including reading, math, and science… learning shapes also helps children understand other signs and symbols.

Why is it significant for kids to learn shapes?

From octagonal stops, signs, and rectangular doors to triangular roofs and circular wheel shapes are everywhere.
Learning shapes not only helps children identify and organize visual information, but it also helps them learn skills in other curriculum areas including reading, math, and science.

For example, an early step in understanding numbers and letters is to recognize their shape. Learning shapes also helps children understand other signs and symbols.
A fun way to help your child learn shapes is to make a shape hunt game.

What is a shape in real life?

We are surrounded by shapes in real life, but what are 2D shapes with two dimensions, such as width and height? An example of a 2D shape is a rectangle or a circle. 2D shapes are flat and cannot be physically held, because they have no depth.

Geometrical shapes in real life

Geometrical shapes in real life

From the droplets of rain to the roundness of oranges, there are all possible types of shapes in nature. There are so many more shapes in real life that we miss out on observing the hustle-bustle of our daily lives.
Shapes in real life: these geometric shapes in real life are so wonderful to see, and sometimes the main recognition of an object.
All shapes, both two-dimensional and three-dimensional, are incredibly important in the context of learning math. The basis of geometry is formed by these shapes and when children learn with the help of examples, they remember it forever.

Let’s take a look at some shapes in real life and what we have observed around us:

Hexagon shapes in real life:

Honey Comb Shapes in Real Life
Honey Comb Shapes in Real Life


Hexagons are typically six straight sides of equal length. You may see snowflakes in that pattern. Ice crystals, the bee house consists of hexagonal cells, all these and other common shapes occurrences of a hexagon in our real life.

Rhombus shapes in real life:

The parallelogram whose sides are equal in length is a square or a rhombus. Rhombus can be found in a variety of things around us, such as a kite, windows of a car, a rhombus-shaped earring, the structure of a building, mirrors, and even a section of the baseball field. It is not a commonly occurring shape in nature; this one is seen in some crystals.

But observe keenly, you will be able to spot some more!

Four equal straight sides with four right angles are a square the most common shapes, square rubber stamps, tiles on the floor are all squares that you see around as examples of squares in real life.
Let us not forget coasters, the chessboard, and the keys to the laptop you are working on! We find the squares in many things around us in real life.

Triangle shapes in real life:

In mathematics, a triangle is known as the most important shape. A triangle is a plane figure, and this plane figure consists of three sides and three angles. Based on the sides and angles, there are various types of triangles. Some essential types of triangles are scalene triangle, isosceles triangle, right-angled triangle, etc.

If we want to make our learning effective, we have to give real-life examples. Its reason is that we can learn concepts effectively with the help of real-life examples.
These shapes are incredibly common and easy to apply and use in everyday life.

Some objects with a triangle shape:
Most kids start their day by eating sandwiches or Slice of Pizza, Road signs, An Arrow, a Triangular Ruler, traffic signs form the most commonly found examples of the triangle in our everyday life.
When you give these practical examples of the triangular shape, your kids will never forget it. They will remember the concept of triangular shapes in real life.


Learning shapes helps your child learn to differentiate between objects. In order to memorize how Shapes in real life are different from one another, they’ll learn to pay attention to the little details that distinguish shapes.
Learning forms not only help children identify and organize visual information, but also help them learn skills in other curriculum areas including reading, math, and science. … Learning shapes also help children understand signs and other symbols.

In preschool, children can learn to recognize and name circles, triangles, squares, rectangles, and ovals. Using materials such as stickers, cubes, books, and toys.

Important examples of geometry, play a pivotal role in the daily life of humans.
Technology:
Geometry is used in various daily life applications such as art, architecture, engineering, robotics, astronomy, sculptures, space, nature, sports, machines, cars, and much more.
Geometry helps us in deciding what materials to use, what design to make, and also plays a vital role in the construction process itself. Different houses and buildings are built in different geometric shapes to give a new look as well as to provide proper ventilation inside the house.

The most common example of geometry in everyday life is technology. Be it robotics or computers or video games, geometry is applied to almost all the underlying concepts.

Explore the previous examples and facts, and you will find yourself getting the necessary knowledge and information to fully grasp the concept of geometrical shapes in daily life. So, keep on visiting our Learning Mole for more information on this topic and much more!

Though recycling has existed throughout history and has always been practised, it is now a crucial part of life. Recycled paper can acually be traced back to 9th century Japan. The Japanese people and culture started recycling paper soon after they learned how to make it. Ancient people have also recycled and reused almost everything they had because of its scarcity. But even though the concept of recycling has existed for that long, it has become popular just recently. Due to the issues and troubles facing our planet and affecting our environment nowadays, more and more people have been finding solutions in recycling and advocating for it. Some communities even have been collectively trying to recycle their waste to save the environment. So let’s explore exactly what recycling is, the importance of recycling in saving our environment, and what we can do to help.

Recycling for Kids
Recycling for Kids

What is Recycling?

    Recycling is the process of recovering waste material and processing and converting it into new reusable products and objects. When waste and garbage get collected from all sorts of places, they usually end up getting burned in waste incinerators or buried in landfills. Recycling, however, allows the waste to go through a detailed process to reprocess it for reuse. This is done to save energy, reduce all kinds of pollution like air, paper, and plastic, and use materials that people throw away but could actually be extremely useful.

    The word recycle itself is made up of the prefix re-, which means again, and the word cycle. This means to give something another cycle after its original cycle has already ended. So in that sense, recycling gives purpose to a thing people would have otherwise thought useless. That’s why recycling is important, and it’s equally important to understand the vital role recycling plays in our lives.

Why is Recycling important?

    Recycling is important for various reasons: it has some positive effects and benefits on our environment and communities; it also helps prevent some of the threats facing our planet.

    There are a lot of issues facing our environment and planet right now that we need to solve. Issues like plastic pollution, air pollution, deforestation, and global warming have been harming our Earth. Let’s take a look at the issues facing our environment so we can see how recycling helps us with them.

Plastic Pollution

    Plastic is one of the most pressing problems we’ve been struggling with over the past years. Plastic usage started back in the 1900s, but there has been an increase in its production lately. By 2018, plastic production was about 359 million metric tonnes per year after it has been about 1.5 million metric tonnes in 1950. More alarming, plastic is being used for more than just the essentials and there’s an increase in single-use plastic products. In the production process of plastics, additives have been added to make them more durable and less brittle. It’s estimated that plastic lasts in the environment for about 500 years or even more.

    When people improperly get rid of and mindlessly throw away plastic waste, it gets scattered all over the land and the seas. And because plastic is so difficult to decompose and break down in the environment, it becomes harmful. Animals either get stuck in it, which endangers and possibly injures the animals, or mistake it for food and eat it. This can cause malnourishment, starvation, illness, and death.

    Due to environmental conditions as well, plastic breaks down into microplastics and plastic particles that get carried away by the wind and seas. In water, fish eat the microplastics and plastic particles they find. In the open air, we inhale these plastic particles with every breath we take. This sadly endangers us as it pollutes our organic system and can cause serious diseases.

    Now, do you see why recycling is important? Because when we properly dispose of plastic and it gets recycled, there will be no harm, either to us, the animals, or our planet.

Air Pollution

    Waste incinerators are places where waste gets burned. And as we all know, there’s no fire without smoke. The burning leads to the release of toxic fumes and smoke from the incinerators into the air. This affects the air quality that we breathe and pollutes our air with toxins. The air even gets double polluted when the waste being burned includes plastics; since plastics are derived from crude oils which release carbons when burnt, this harms our atmosphere. The air pollution caused by this can lead up to many harmful things. We wouldn’t be able to breathe properly because of the smoke and the fumes; it badly affects our health and can lead to heart disease, lung cancer, and respiratory diseases.

    That’s why we need to increase our recycling; one of its alternatives is just burning the waste which has a lot of harmful effects on us and our atmosphere. In England alone, around 60% of the waste burnt in the incinerators can actually be recycled. So let’s try to think of a long-term solution and start investing in our health and planet.

Paper Production and Deforestation

    The paper production and manufacturing process is also one of the dangers our environment faces. From beginning to end, the process starts with the cutting down of a tree and ends with emitting carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. Even paper as small as receipts are greatly harmful to the environment: they are made with 10 million trees and use one billion gallons of water and 250 million gallons of oil. Paper production also uses about 40% of the world’s cut timber. More troublesome than this, more than 30 million acres of trees are cut on a yearly basis. The number of trees we kill just for paper is monumental and leads to deforestation.

  Deforestation is the removal and clearance of the forests on the land. It leads to greenhouse gas emissions. Naturally, trees and forests hold carbon dioxide in their wood and leaves. When trees are cut down, the gas escapes into the atmosphere. About 12% of worldwide greenhouse gas emissions are because of deforestation.

  As if this isn’t enough, deforestation affects the animals and the indigenous people of the land. They once depended on the forest land to survive and make a living, but when there’s no more forest? To them, it’s almost as if there’s no more life.

 Recycling paper, however, helps prevent almost all of this from happening. Instead of cutting down more trees (in turn, emitting greenhouse gases and endangering human and animal life), we’d be saving tree land as we wouldn’t need to cut them down anymore. Recycling one tonne of paper saves up to 17 trees and 4100 kilowatts per hour of electricity.

  So to save ourselves before we destroy all that’s around us, it’s time to start recycling paper to avoid the currently everlasting fight against deforestation.

Landfills and Global Warming

    One way of waste management is to take the waste and bury it in landfill sites. The way it works is that waste is collected and taken to a landfill site, where it would either be piled up on the ground or buried in a hole dug in the land. This can cause a lot of problems, like pollution, for the environment. Waste usually consists of organic waste, plastics, wood, and electronics. Many materials that are in the waste contain toxins that harm the land. Electronic waste actually includes hazardous materials like lead, mercury, acids, and solvents; all of the substances can and do infect the soil and the underground water.

    As for organic waste, when it gets buried underground, it can no longer interact with the oxygen in the air, which doesn’t allow it to break down as fast as it usually does when out in the open. After a while, the waste starts producing methane. If methane gas builds up in the same spot, it can be a threat as it’s flammable. Methane is also a greenhouse gas much more potent than carbon dioxide, which increases global warming.

    According to the United Nations, global warming is a long-term shift in temperatures and weather patterns. Since the 1800s, the shift is occurring due to human activities rather than natural ones. Global warming is mainly caused by greenhouse gases, gases that trap the heat in the atmosphere. This threatens our environment and planet for multiple reasons. The increasing temperature all over the globe affects both of our poles, the North and the South; ice at the poles starts melting, endangering animals and species living there. When ice melts, it adds more water to the oceans; hence, sea levels are gradually rising, and lands are gradually receding. It all disrupts all kinds of creatures, ranging from sea species to land animals. So we need to do our duty and protect them.

    Though it sounds scary, it’s not an impossible scenario. All we need to do is reduce the amount of waste going to landfills. When we reduce the waste by reusing our products or recycling them, the methane gas and toxins produced in landfill sites can be easily managed when they’re not in huge quantities.

    The importance of recycling isn’t just limited to preventing threats from occurring; its importance also lies in saving the energy of our planet and helping small communities and individuals. So let’s take a look at how we benefit from recycling and how it helps our planet.

Energy Saving

    It takes a lot of energy and tonnes of resources to manufacture a product from scratch. For example, as stated before, making receipts requires 10 million trees, one-billion gallons of water, and 250 million gallons of oil. The paper production industry on its own uses about 4% of the world’s energy. So it takes valuable energy and resources to make products. On the other hand, making the same product from recycled materials is much easier: the material got processed and refined once before so making the product will be a simpler process and will save energy and resources. Seventeen trees are saved when a tonne of paper is recycled; recycling aluminium can use only 5% of the energy used to make the original product and reduces the water and air pollution and energy use by 95%; to recycle one glass bottle is to save energy that lights a 100-watt light bulb for four hours. So recycling helps us conserve the energy of our planet and our natural resources.

Job Opportunities

   When we become more aware and conscious of our environment and decide to recycle, investors would then encourage and help recycling plants. The recycling industry then would grow and, in turn, help the communities by providing employment options. In Northern Ireland, over 80% of what’s collected from the curbside boxes is recycled locally which creates more job opportunities for people living there. Like any other establishment or business, this boosts the economy, especially on a local level, and helps people find more jobs.

    Now we know what threats our planet is facing due to improper waste management, threats like plastic pollution, air pollution, deforestation, global warming, and much more. And though recycling isn’t the only solution, it at least allows people to be more understanding and conscious of their actions and how they can affect our planet. So now we know that what we need to do is to reduce our consumption, reuse our products, and recycle our waste. But how is the waste recycled? And what waste can be recycled? Let’s find out.

Recyclables and the Recycling Process

    Recyclables is the term used to describe the materials that can be recycled. Almost everything we know of can be recycled or even reused. The materials are both non-organic and organic waste; they include glass, paper (like cardboard, newspapers, etc.), plastics, metal, fabrics, electronics, and food.

    The process of recycling starts really simple: recyclable waste needs to be collected. There are different methods of collecting the recyclables and four collection programs: curbside collection, drop-off centres, and buy-back centres.

    Curbside collection is where recyclable plants would have systems in place to go and pick up people’s recyclable waste at the curbside. The waste could be divided into different sections for the different recyclable materials.

    In the case curbside collection isn’t wanted, an alternative for this collection method is drop-off centres. As the name implies, drop-off centres are centres where people drop off their recyclable waste.

    Buy-back centres are almost the same drop-off centres; the only difference is that buy-back centres are willing to buy the recyclable waste and pay a fee for it (drop-off centres mostly don’t pay any money for the recyclable materials).

    After the collection process comes the sortation process. If the recyclables aren’t already sorted before getting collected, then they get sorted in the recyclable plants manually and automatically.

    A good example of the recycling sorting process can be seen in Bryson Recycling, a recycling factory in Northern Ireland. They use wheelie boxes for the curbside collection method to collect the recyclable waste. The wheelie box is divided into different sections for different recyclables. At the curb, workers from Bryson Recycling further sort the waste by separating glass from paper and so on. This makes it easier for when they get back to the factory as almost no more sorting is needed.

    Only plastics and metal need additional sorting to separate them. They’re sorted automatically: they’re added to a conveyor belt and at the top of it there’s a magnet that attracts all the metals and cans. Plastics are then sorted by the optical sorting method: a ray of light hits the waste (so it helps identify the plastics), then a jet of air separates it into a different section in the conveyor.

    After the recyclables get sorted, they then start the recycling process. It’s a complex process that differs from each material to the next; here’s a general overview of how each material gets recycled and important information about each material’s recycling.

How to Recycle for Kids
How to Recycle

Glass Recycling

    Glass is a material that’s 100% recyclable; it can be recycled repeatedly without losing its quality or purity. Not all glass products can be recycled as they use a different manufacturing process; if they get recycled with normal glass, they ruin the recycled glass and recycling process for that batch. The glass products that cannot be recycled include windows, mirrors, light bulbs, Pyrex, crystal, eyeglasses, and fluorescent lighting tubes.

    To recycle glass, it should be free of all contaminants like metal or plastic lids. There’s a pre-treatment process where a jet of air is used to blow away paper or plastic; then a magnet is used to remove all the metal objects. There are different colours of glass products; if reprocessed together, they wouldn’t meet the standards for glass colouring. So glass waste, after the pre-treatment process, gets separated into different glass colours and washed to remove any impurities. The glass waste then gets broken up into small glass pieces that are called cullet. They then get crushed and mixed with raw material like sand or soda ash. They are melted together in a furnace at 1000 degrees Fahrenheit; then they are moulded into different glass products of different colours.

Paper Recycling

    After going to the recycling plant, the paper gets separated into different types and grades. When it’s time for recycling, the paper gets added to soapy water to wash away all the residue from the original use, residue like ink, staples, plastic films, and glue. The paper is then put into a large holder filled with water; it gets mixed with the water to create a slurry. To make different paper products (like cardboard, toilet paper, office paper, and newspaper), different materials are added to the slurry. The final step is the slurry, using rollers, is spread into large thin sheets, left to dry, and gets rolled up to be cut off later and made into different products.

Plastic Recycling

    After the plastic waste gets separated from other materials, it needs to be divided into different types of plastic. A method used to separate plastics based on density is called the sink-float: plastic products are put in water where high-density plastic would sink and low-density plastic would float. Plastic waste then is washed to remove all kinds of contaminants and residues as they can ruin the recycled plastic. After that, the plastic is put in shredders and grinding machines to shred it into smaller flakes and tiny pieces. The final stage is where plastic is melted and forced through an extruder to form plastic pellets. The pellets then go through various methods to make different plastic products.

Metal Recycling

    Metal waste, like plastic waste, is separated into different kinds of metal so it can be recycled. After the separation, the metal is shredded into small pieces; this allows the metal to take less time when melted. The smaller pieces are added to a furnace under a high temperature to be melted; the molten metal then goes through an electrolysis system to remove all the contaminants and impurities. Then it is shaped into ingots to be moulded and manipulated later on into different shapes and forms.

Fabrics Recycling

    Clothes are first checked to see if they can be reused. If the clothes are in good shape, they’re sent to charities for further use. Afterwards, natural fabrics get pulled or shredded into fibres. The fibre then goes through a process where it is spun once then twice to create yarn, to be used later for knitting or sewing to make new clothes. Some fibres are compressed to make fillings for products like mattresses.

    Synthetic fabrics, on the other hand, have a bit of a different process. The zippers and buttons are removed; the fabric is then shredded into smaller pieces. The shredded fabric gets moulded into pellets to be melted, later to be used to make fibres that make the clothes we know and love today.

Organic and Food Recycling

    Before everything, we should know that not all organic waste can be recycled and that waste that cannot be recycled includes milk and oils. Now take a look at the recycling process.

    Recycling organic waste turns it into soil compost and fertiliser. When organic waste is buried in landfills, it’s removed from air and oxygen; so it emits greenhouse gases like methane and CO2 as mentioned previously. So one way of recycling and composting organic waste is by using the gas emissions to get energy. This way is called Anaerobic Digestion. In this method, organic waste is placed in enclosed tanks that cut off all the oxygen. Bacteria and microorganisms then digest the waste and turn it into compost that gets used as fertilisers for the soil. Greenhouse gas emissions like methane are produced during the process; they get used as renewable energy to generate electricity for example.

    Another method for recycling and composting organic waste is called In-Vessel Composting (IVC). The waste is screened to remove contaminants like metal and plastic. The waste is then shredded and placed in a closed vessel where oxygen, temperature, and moisture are carefully controlled to ensure the waste gets composted in an ideal environment. The waste starts to decompose naturally due to microorganisms breaking it down: this generates heat that raises the temperature to 60-70 degrees Celsius. It lasts from two to four weeks. Then the composted waste is placed in long rows, called windrows, to continue the recycling process; this lasts about ten to fourteen weeks with regular turning of the compost now and then. Some final tests are needed to make sure the quality is good, and the material is safe to be used as fertilisers.

    As all the recyclable materials are now finally recycled and ready for reuse, they get distributed to companies and businesses that need them for their products or work.

What Can We Do for Recycling?

    After all is said and done, and now that we know the importance of recycling and the threats if we don’t recycle, we need to know exactly what we can do as individuals to help save our planet.

Why is recycling important for kids?
Why is recycling important for kids?

    The first thing we need to be mindful of is to reduce the products we buy and use. Oftentimes we’ll buy the products even though we don’t need them, maybe because of a discount offer. And since the more products we have, the more waste we produce, it’s always better to buy necessary products and not exceed our needs. When we do buy products, we need to keep in mind that the products are made of recyclable materials and can be recycled again.

    We need to reduce our waste as well. We can do so by saving leftover food and eating it instead of throwing it away, or we can share it either with people we love and also our neighbours. This is to ensure the food isn’t wasted. Another way to reduce our waste is also by reusing plastic bags instead of throwing them away. Most shops baggage our products into plastic bags; so we can keep a drawer in our cabinets where we save plastic bags to reuse them as needed. Plastic bags aren’t the only products that can be reused; newspapers can be reused as a wrap for fragile products when we’re moving. Keep another drawer in your cabinets for some newspapers that you can use when needed.

    If you have some old clothes you don’t want anymore, you can donate them to charities or give them away to people you know who need them. You can also get creative with your old clothes and turn them into different designs; jeans can be turned into bags, large t-shirts can be made into dresses, skirts can be made into blouses, and so much more. Just grab your sketch, draw the design, and start getting creative with the old material you have. If clothes cannot be salvaged at all, they can be cut into rectangles and used as cleaning rags. So there’s more than just one solution for each problem.

    Glass products like jars and bottles can be reused at home as well. Instead of buying glass jars to store some food in the fridge or freezer, you can just thoroughly wash a jar that you have and use it. Jars can also be used to store your spices instead of keeping them in the plastic packaging they come in. If you fancy some homemade juice or just some cold water, you can use the glass bottles to store them in the fridge.

    Waste, despite this, is inevitable, so we need to prepare for it as well. We can do a little research to find our local recycling plants. We can arrange curbside collection, or we can drop off the recyclable materials that we’ve gathered. It’s important to prepare the materials for recycling and so it’s better to separate them into different boxes; remember not to baggage them in bags as this can slow down the recycling process. For plastic, aluminium, and any food and drink container, it’s important to rinse out the food and drink residue and clean them; this helps quicken the recycling process.

    If recycling at home is something you might like, some recycling you can do is paper recycling and organic waste compost.

    For paper, you need paper scraps, an old blender, a tub, a framed screen, towels or old bedsheets, a sponge, and some water. Cut the paper scraps into small squares then put some paper in the blender alongside some water. Keep adding paper and water till the paper is gone and it turns into a slurry. Pour the slurry into a tub and fill it with water; the amount of water depends on the thickness you want for your paper – more water and less slurry mean thin paper; more slurry and less water mean thick paper. Use the framed screen to mould your paper: submerge the framed screen in the tub at an angle and get it out. Give it a little shake, let the waters drip, then put it on a towel or any old bedsheet. Use the sponge to press the paper into the towel then remove the frame. Hang the towel to dry and repeat the process. If you want to give your paper some colour, you can add some food colouring to the tub. Now that you have your recycled pieces of paper, you can get creative with the products you want to turn the paper into.

    If you’re into gardening, you can compost your food waste. Just dig a small surface-level hole in the ground and add your organic waste to it. Cover it with soil, especially soil that has the nutrients it needs to compost; make sure not to smother it with soil so as not to cut out the oxygen, as it needs oxygen to decompose properly. Give it a little stir and turn it on a regular basis. It takes from about one to two months to compost. After it turns into compost, spread it into areas in your garden that need some fertilising and compost to grow your plants normally.

    We can do more to help with recycling by educating our friends, relatives, and neighbours. Individual effort is appreciated, but to make more than a little difference, the effort needs to be collective. So we can speak with our friends and acquaintances to educate them on recycling and its benefits. At schools, we can speak with those in charge and help arrange activities that would encourage students and teachers alike to recycle. In our communities and neighbourhoods, we can dedicate one day monthly to spread the word and raise awareness of recycling and its importance.

    Recycling teaches us compassion, patience, empathy, and respect; we learn to be mindful and conscious of our planet and the environment around us. We understand we’re not the only living beings on Earth and so we need to be thoughtful about our actions and their consequences. We set a great example for kids when we respect our planet like that and make a conscious effort to help it remain beautiful and keep it healthy for future generations. That’s why we need to always keep in mind that we must respect the planet that provides us with the sustenance we need and that it’s a two-way relationship. Just like our planet provides for us, we need to keep our planet healthy, look out for it, and always make it a better place.